Monday, March 21, 2011

".XXX" Domain Has Been Approved


We've all seen the top-level domains for all different sorts of websites. (.com, .net, .org, .gov, and so on...see the full list below).

It looks like we can add one more domain to that list: .xxx

On Friday (March 18, 2011), the board of the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), has approved for there to be a designated area for pornographic websites. It's been roughly 10 years for the Internet to reach this point, and for good reason.

Doing this has not been without its hardships. It has opposition from both sides, believe it or not: religious groups argued that doing this will legitimize porn (they might be a little late to that party). Also, pornographers fear that this will only make it easier for governments to mandate the websites within and block them.

via The Huffington Post:
Diane Duke, executive director of the adult entertainment industry's Free Speech Coalition has stated that ICANN "disregarded overwhelming outpouring of opposition from the adult entertainment industry – the supposed sponsorship community" and dismissed the "interests of free speech on the Internet."
Supporters of the .xxx domain have said that this is all part of the openness that is in line with the philosophy of the Internet.

Of course, for the one guy that got this whole thing started (ICM Registry CEO, Stuart Lawley), this is not just a matter of having a special area for certain content on the Internet; there is also a matter of making some major money.

Being the person who submitted the application for all .xxx domains, Mr. Lawley will be in charge of all the domain names, and he will also be collecting all of the fees that are entailed with having ".xxx" at the end of their website.

That fee, according to Lawley, will be $60 a year. Multiply that by the number of potential .xxx websites (estimated at 500,000 byt this summer), and that's a handsome sum. Of course, there has been protest, as all other domains cost only $10 a year.


It looks like the Internet is finally getting a little more order, and looking a little less like the Wild West. It was fun while it lasted, folks. Of course, this isn't the end; it's just a baby step in the slowest of crawls toward something that sort-of resembles a society.

...and now, just for the hell of it, here is a list of all top-level domains.
Country domains are excluded from this list.

  • .aero
    • air travel domains
  • .asia
    • companies, individuals, & organizations in Asia-Pacific region
  • .biz
    • business use
  • .cat
    • Catalan language/culture
  • .com
    • commercial organizations, but unrestricted
  • .coop
    • cooperatives
  • .edu
    • post-secondary educational establishments
  • .gov
    • government entities within the United States at the federal, state, and local levels
  • .info
    • informational sites, but unrestricted
  • .int
    • international organizations established by treaty
  • .jobs
    • employment-related sites
  • .mil
    • the U.S. military
  • .mobi
    • sites catering to mobile devices
  • .museum
    • museum websites
  • .name
    • families and individuals
  • .net
    • originally for network infrastructures, now unrestricted
  • .org
    • originally for organizations not clearly falling within the other gTLDs, now unrestricted
  • .pro
    • certain professions
  • .tel
    • services involving connections between the telephone network and the Internet (added March 2, 2007)
  • .travel
    • travel agents, airlines, hoteliers, tourism bureaus, etc.


story via The Huffington Post
domain list via Wikipedia
pic: mudflap girl, random laptop





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1 comment:

Anonymous said...

DotXXX has been approved by ICANN, but not yet by IANA and the US Department of Commerce. Given the fact that the Department of Commerce rejected the dotxxx proposal last time and the fact that the GAC advised ICANN to reject it, it is still possible that the dotxxx sTLD will never see the light of day.